There are many things to do in the city of Saint Paul, Minnesota. If you are a dog enthusiast, not to worry, we have many things for your dogs here! Mostly off leash dog parks.

Saint Paul currently has four off-leash dog parks. Dogs are only allowed off-leash in the four dog parks listed below.

Arlington/Arkwright Dog Park, which is located on the corner of Arlington Ave and Arkwright St. The rectangular 4.5-acre plot of land provides wooded trails, open space, and a large bowl-shaped slope for dogs to roam around in.

Indian Mounds Regional Park is a public park in Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States, featuring six prehistoric Native American burial mounds overlooking the Mississippi River. The oldest mounds were constructed 1,500–2,000 years ago by people of the Hopewell tradition. Later the Dakota people interred their dead there as well. At least 31 more mounds were destroyed by development in the late 19th century. They were the tallest Native American mounds in Minnesota or Wisconsin (except for the unique 45-foot (14 m) Grand Mound outside International Falls, Minnesota), and comprise one of the northwesternmost Hopewellian sites in North America. Indian Mounds Regional Park is a component of the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area, a unit of the National Park System. The Mounds Group is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 2014 nomination document provides a description of the archaeology and the context.

The Ordway Center for the Performing Arts is located in downtown Saint Paul, Minnesota and hosts a variety of performing arts, such as touring Broadway musicals, orchestra, opera, and cultural performers. It serves as a home to several local arts organizations, including the Minnesota Opera, The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, and The Schubert Club. Jamie Grant is currently the President and CEO. Rod Kaats is the Producing Artistic Director.

St. Paul Civic Center was an indoor arena that was part of the RiverCentre. The arena opened on January 1, 1973, and had seating capacity of approximately 16,000 for hockey. The Civic Center was the home of both iterations of the Minnesota Fighting Saints of the WHA—the first from 1973 to 1976 and the second from 1976 to 1977. The arena was renamed the RiverCentre in the mid-1990s. The arena was torn down in 1998 to make way for the Xcel Energy Center which opened in 2000. The boys’ state high school hockey and basketball tournaments were also held at the Civic Center as well as three NCAA Frozen Four national ice hockey championships. The arena was also the home of Verne Gagne’s American Wrestling Association (AWA).

The arena was unique in North America in that the hockey dasher boards were made of clear acrylic glass from the shelf all the way down to the ice. This was because the arena’s seating configuration was round, and the closest seats between the blue lines were not flush against the boards. The clear boards made for better sightlines for most spectators seated between the blue lines, since the seating angles in the Civic Center were shallow. The clear boards were replaced with standard white dashers boards when the Minnesota Moose of the International Hockey League played there, as the team needed to be able to sell advertising on the boards. This wrecked the sightlines for what should have been the best seats, and this illustrated that Saint Paul needed a new arena with appropriately-designed seating.

In 1998 the NHL expansion team Minnesota Wild announced a lease to play in St. Paul until 2030. The St. Paul Civic Center started demolition shortly thereafter. The Xcel Energy Center opened in 2000, and it sits on the site of the Civic Center.

Schools Located in St Paul, MN

IOT Solutions St Paul

Homepage